Neelkanth

I made my way up a mountain from Tapovan, near Laxman Jhula, I was searching for Neelkanth, a tree that a god had sat for 8000 years dispersing a poison it swallowed for the sake of the world.

First I walked through rishikesh, whimpering in its sleep at 5am, not awake but restless for the day. Crossing the radiant bridge not a soul but a dog made a whisper as it walked on the cement underneath, near the beach on the other side. Quiet but the sound of the wind wading through the ganges like a ghost who was set on reminding me that people think the river was holy. I heard a leaf skip it’s way a long the pavement.

Is it true that whatever the wind blesses will embrace a life renewed?

Relying on the directions of strangers I found myself at a fork, one was to a tiger sanctuary and the other to who knows. I asked and they told me to walk with tigers, so I did. Scared but alive. I don’t think these people wanted to speak. It was too early, the world here was not awake, yet.

The wind blew as I stood 1/2 way to Neelkanth 4 km up this trail, it moved around my ears. Polarising this world, knowing fully when it is balanced we become one. I saw the expanse of humanity from a cement block, stretching far, like a waking man, choking rivers and thankful to be alive, eating the world one bite at a time.

Is it true, that whom the wind blesses will experience truth?

I walked and struggled, air was lighter, but I pushed and hoped the wind would touch me, so I could feel the world brush against me for a second. I encountered twists and forks but guided by strangers I made my way about 3/4 up to stop for breakfast. Chai and biscuits, how real. They coughed from marijuana and offered me some, already light headed, I refused.

I heard when the wind blessed you, you could experience the highest joy, so instead I waited for it to sweep across my face and send a shiver down my spine.

There were birds there that have feathers that looked like ceremonial hats sticking out and proud, they fluttered near me, dark with speckles of colour and about the size of a lorikeet, they live in the wind. What do they know?

There was rubbish everywhere, I can see why… It had nowhere to go. Like a lot of things, stuck.

I made my way to the temple. It was crowded. I got blessed twice. I ate some food, I was blessed again, I smiled at a smiler so I was blessed a fourth time. Vacant wind but blessings abound. People must be clever, learning the tricks of nature, blessing with nothing, or something, or everything in their deepest hearts. The same way wind can ripple across water in the morning or pick up a leaf and send it far away.